In Act I, scene ii of Julius Caesar, interpret Brutus, lines 82-89, then another paragraph for Cassius lines 90-131.Can you please make Brutus's lines as one paragraph and Cassius's lines another...

In Act I, scene ii of Julius Caesar, interpret Brutus, lines 82-89, then another paragraph for Cassius lines 90-131.

Can you please make Brutus's lines as one paragraph and Cassius's lines another one. This will make it easier to answer my question. Please and thank you so much!

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pickjmh | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

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This scene introduces what will be one of the main conflicts, both internally and externally in the play. Internally, in lines 82-89, we find out Brutus's feelings toward Caesar. He admits that he does not want Caesar to be king. In addition, we find out that Brutus feels honor and the people of Rome are his highest priority. Thus the audience sees, throughout the play, the internal conflict between Brutus's desire to honor his friendship and loyalty to Caesar, and his desire to do what is best for his country. (Later in the play, it could be argued that Brutus is not acting wholly unselfishly, but this isn't really seen during this speech.) 

Externally, the plot against Caesar begins. Brutus's words provide the opening Cassius needs to convince Brutus to join in his plan. Knowing that Brutus will make his decision based on what he feels is the best thing for Rome, Cassius gets him to join in the assassination plot through a combination of flattering Brutus, emphasizing the importance of freedom (which he feels Caesar's rule would take away) and humanizing Caesar. Cassius begins his speech by pointing out that all three men (Caesar, Brutus, Cassius) are equal. He then goes on to flatter Brutus and tell him how well-respected he is. He ends this section by showing Caesar's physical inferiority. All of this he does in an effort to convince Brutus that something serious must be done to keep Caesar from ruling.  

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