Act II What are Mrs. Pearce's objections when Higgins decides to keep Eliza in his house?

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Mrs. Pearce has two main objections when Higgins wants to have Eliza stay at his house. The first is that it is simply not proper in that time and place. Eliza is a young, unmarried woman, and such things are not done by proper people. Mrs. Pearce also knows Higgins...

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Mrs. Pearce has two main objections when Higgins wants to have Eliza stay at his house. The first is that it is simply not proper in that time and place. Eliza is a young, unmarried woman, and such things are not done by proper people. Mrs. Pearce also knows Higgins well, and is concerned with what will become of Eliza after Higgins is finished with her. Eliza will be someone with the correct social skills and accents to fit in with the wealthy people, but will have no resources after Higgins is done with her. There is also fear on her part of what the interaction will do to Higgins--it seems there is some part of Mrs. Pearce that is simply distressed about how Higgins treats people as subjects, and what it will do to him eventually.

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