In Act 4, Scene 1, why doesn't the Friar tell Paris or the Capulets that Juliet and Romeo are married? Is the Friar trying to protect himself or them?

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This is a really good question, and a matter of opinion.

I am going to take the easy way out and say that he must be trying to protect both parties.

I do not think that he is only trying to protect himself.  He does not come across as a...

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This is a really good question, and a matter of opinion.

I am going to take the easy way out and say that he must be trying to protect both parties.

I do not think that he is only trying to protect himself.  He does not come across as a selfish person and he seems like he truly cares for Romeo and Juliet.

However, I think that he is trying to protect himself, or perhaps his dream of getting the two families to end their feud.  Because of Romeo killing Tybalt, it seems unlikely that the two sides could come together now.  So, by trying to put off a confrontation, I think the Friar is trying to allow things to cool off so that his plan can work out.

So he is trying to protect both himself and the two lovers, but also to protect his plan.

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