In Act 4, Scene 1 of Hamlet, what are Claudius's chief concerns with regard to the murder?

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Firstly, Hamlet's act is not actually murder but culpable homicide. He had no intention to kill Polonius. His target was Claudius and he thought that he was the one that he had stabbed through the arras. We know this because when Gertrude asks him if he knows what he has done, he replies:

Nay, I know not:
Is it the king?

When he later discovers that it was Polonius he killed, he responds thus:

Thou wretched, rash, intruding fool, farewell!
I took thee for thy better....

It is evident that he thinks he has stabbed Claudius. Polonius's death was, therefore, accidental and Hamlet cannot be said to have murdered him.

When Gertrude tells Claudius what happened, he says that it is a hefty and burdensome deed since it has to be answered for and involves two pre-eminent members of Danish society. He further expresses the idea that he could have been the one harmed if he had been there:

It had been so with us, had we been there....

He states that Hamlet's freedom is a threat to everyone, implying that the young...

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