In act 3, scene 5 of Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet, how are the conflicting perceptions of traditional gender roles shown and how does it show Juliet's objectification?Specifically, I'm...

In act 3, scene 5 of Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet, how are the conflicting perceptions of traditional gender roles shown and how does it show Juliet's objectification?

Specifically, I'm looking at the quote spoken by Lord Capulet saying, "An you be mine, I'll give you to my friend" (III.v.191).

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tinicraw | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Dictionary.com defines the word "objectify" as "to present as and object." Therefore, with reference to the above quote by Juliet's father, Lord Capulet, he most certainly is treating his daught like an object. In his mind, she is his possession that he can freely give and take as he pleases. It is interesting to note that this scene has three women in it with one man and he clearly dominates them all by telling them to be quiet in one way or another after they object to his tactics. For example, the nurse comes to Juliet's defense by saying, "You are to blame, my lord, to rate her so" (III.v.169). In response, Capulet dismisses her as some low-life gossip. When his wife advises him to calm down with, "You are too hot" (III.v.175), he simply ignores her. All three women are beneath him in his eyes. Employees like the nurse would never talk back to an employer. Wives usually remained quiet; which, eventually Juliet's mother does and leaves her daughter to work it out herself. Daughters were supposed to be obedient and submissive; when Juliet isn't, it causes a lot of trouble for her.

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