In Act 3, Scene 4 of Macbeth, the whole section, what does Macbeth's character exactly portray by saying: Please help!:)That, when the brains were out, the man would die, And there an end. But now...

In Act 3, Scene 4 of Macbeth, the whole section, what does Macbeth's character exactly portray by saying:

Please help!:)

That, when the brains were out, the man would die,

And there an end. But now they rise again,

With twenty mortal murders on their crowns,

And push us from our stools. This is more strange

Than such a murder is (III.iv.78-82).

This is the section I am talking about.

Asked on by jinalp

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amarang9 | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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In this scene from Macbeth, Macbeth is really starting to show signs of borderline madness. He is so overcome with guilt and fear of his crime being discovered that he begins to hallucinate. He sees Banquo's ghost in this scene and notes that this manifestation is "more strange than such a murder is." It is in this scene that Macbeth really starts to acknowledge the mental anguish he is dealing with as a result of guilt and his fear of the witches' prophecy that Banquo's descendants will be kings. Fleance, Banquo's son, escaped the murder attempt. Macbeth's conscience is so overwhelmed by guilt and fear that he begins to hallucinate and concludes that, because of the strangeness of the ghost, his offences have a spiritual in addition to a psychological significance. 

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