In act 3, scene 2, what is Macbeth's state of mind?

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Macbeth tells his wife, regarding Banquo,

We have scorched the snake, not killed it.
She'll close and be herself whilst our poor malice
Remains in danger of her former tooth.
But let the frame of things disjoint, both the words suffer,
Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep
In the affliction of these terrible dreams
That shake us nightly. Better to be with the dead,
Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to peace,
Than on the torture of the mind to lie
In restless ecstasy (3.2.15–24).

He does not feel secure in his power. Macbeth fears that Banquo's heirs will somehow jeopardize his position on the throne, either by removing him from it or by inheriting it after him, since he has no children of his own. However, he vows that heaven and earth can fall apart before he will eat his meals in fear or continue to deal with the awful nightmares he's been having each night. He thinks that it would actually be better to be dead, like Duncan , than to be awake and feeling so tortured and anxious. Macbeth...

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