In act 2 scene 3-4 Elizabethans were fascinated with potions and poisons and the Friar's soliloquy enthralled them.paraphrase his soliloquy , nothing that he is speaking about the dichotomy of...

In act 2 scene 3-4 Elizabethans were fascinated with potions and poisons and the Friar's soliloquy enthralled them.

paraphrase his soliloquy , nothing that he is speaking about the dichotomy of nature and man

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missy575 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

He starts by noticing it is the crack of dawn. It encourages him to go about the business of his chores, which included weeding and feeding the plants of his garden we assume.

One stark comparison that can be made is the earth's relationship with plant life and mankind alike:

And from her womb children of divers kind
We sucking on her natural bosom find,
Many for many virtues excellent,
None but for some and yet all different.

Both entities depend on the earth for sustinence, and those things we feed on can be both beneficial and detrimental. He says the same about plants on their own, but looking at this next quote, think about how these qualities can apply to people too... are their people who heal us and others who poison us? Are there those who can do both in our lives?

Within the infant rind of this small flower
Poison hath residence and medicine power:
For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part;
Being tasted, slays all senses with the heart.
Two such opposed kings encamp them still
In man as well as herbs, grace and rude will;
And where the worser is predominant,
Full soon the canker death eats up that plant.

 

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Romeo and Juliet

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