In Romeo and Juliet, what are the patterns in Romeo's language about death and fate that indicate his attitude towards his own future?  Please refer to Act 1, scene 4, lines 107-114.Here is the...

In Romeo and Juliet, what are the patterns in Romeo's language about death and fate that indicate his attitude towards his own future?  Please refer to Act 1, scene 4, lines 107-114.

Here is the excerpt.

Romeo:

I fear, too early: for my mind misgives 
Some consequence yet hanging in the stars 
Shall bitterly begin his fearful date 
With this night's revels and expire the term 
Of a despised life closed in my breast 
By some vile forfeit of untimely death. 
But He, that hath the steerage of my course, 
Direct my sail! On, lusty gentlemen.

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jbteacherman | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

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Romeo is concerned as the boys make their way to the Capulet ball.  The others are excited, anxiously urging Romeo to stop being so negative and join them for a night of enjoyment at the Capulet's expense.  But as Benvolio warns that they will be late, Romeo quips that he fears they will be "too early."  For whatever reason, he thinks something bad is going to happen if he attends the party.  He believes the party will set in motion a chain of events that he will not be able to stop.  Ultimately, this will lead to his "untimely death."  He has no idea what will happen, but the audience does.  Because Shakespeare starts the play with the prologue, we know that Romeo will meet Juliet, fall in love, and that their love will lead to their demise.  Shakepsepeare even hints that this is their fate, calling them "star-crossed lovers."  Romeo finally decides to attend the party with his freinds, admitting that fate will do with him what it will, and that he has no control over "the steerage of (his) course."  Fate, here, is in control, and Romeo will pay with his life.

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