According to The Wanderer, a wise man understands what aspect of life?

The Wander realizes certain aspects of life that make a man wise and understands that time, patience, and a continued quest for understanding result in increased wisdom and allow a wise man to recognize certain truths about himself and the world around him.

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According to The Wanderer, a wise man realizes many things. He realizes that the length of time a man has lived often determines the amount of wisdom he possesses. A wise man knows that experience in the world breeds knowledge and that with this knowledge comes wisdom.

For example,...

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According to The Wanderer, a wise man realizes many things. He realizes that the length of time a man has lived often determines the amount of wisdom he possesses. A wise man knows that experience in the world breeds knowledge and that with this knowledge comes wisdom.

For example, as a man grows older, he sees and endures certain situations in life, and as a result, he becomes more aware of the truths of the world. The Wanderer understands that a truly wise man contains the traits of thoughtfulness, introspection, and patience. He never speaks without thinking or acts without speculating on the outcomes of his behavior. In other words, a wise man always examines his emotions, actions, motives, and words, and he always reflects on their possible impact on others.

For example, the Wanderer says that a wise man never makes a promise that he cannot keep. He says a wise man does not brag of his courage or strength until he has proven himself worthy and deserving of doing so. Most importantly, the Wanderer comprehends the sorrowful but inevitable fate of all things in the world. For instance, he understands the reality that no man and no thing can avoid the decay and destruction that is the end result of all things. Specifically, he realizes that in spite of all men's glorious accomplishments, all humans must face the common fate of death.

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