According to the prologue of Romeo and Juliet, what ends the rage between two families of Verona?

According to the prologue of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, the rage, or the longstanding feud between the two households of Verona, will not end until the death of the "star-cross'd lovers," who are children of each of the feuding households.

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The Chorus says that the subject of the play will be "the continuance of" the mutual "rage" felt by the two sets of parents "Which, but their children's end, naught could remove" (lines 10–11). In other words, only the deaths of their children, Romeo and Juliet , can end the...

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The Chorus says that the subject of the play will be "the continuance of" the mutual "rage" felt by the two sets of parents "Which, but their children's end, naught could remove" (lines 10–11). In other words, only the deaths of their children, Romeo and Juliet, can end the rage felt by the Montagues and Capulets toward one another. This "ancient grudge" has existed for so long, and yet it continues to result in "new mutin[ies]": it would, evidently, require something really significant to put an end to it.

In fact, by the end of act 5, scene 3, when everyone rushes to the Capulets' tomb to see what has happened, Lord Montague explains that his wife has died as a result of her "Grief of [their] sons's exile" (5.3.219). After Friar Lawrence explains what happened to the young lovers and Romeo's man and Paris's page corroborate some of the details, the Prince chastises Lords Capulet and Montague, saying that their hate for one another caused "heaven" to find "means to kill [their] joys with love" (5.3.303).

Capulet asks to shake Montague's hand, and Montague promises to commission a golden statue of Juliet, to honor her faithfulness to Romeo. This prompts Capulet to promise to commission a similarly rich statue of Romeo, and he calls the young lovers "Poor sacrifices of [their] enmity" (5.3.315). We might interpret their reconciliation as a sincere and complete one, or we might interpret the lords' promises to honor the other's child with elaborate and golden statues as a proud example of one-up-manship.

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The Shakespearean sonnet that is the prologue of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet provides a remarkable amount of information in just fourteen lines of iambic pentameter.

The first quatrain (the first four lines) of the sonnet introduces the characters in a general sense ("two households"), tells the audience that the two households have the same high social standing ("both alike in dignity"), and informs that the households have a longstanding feud ("ancient grudge") that has once again erupted into violence ("break to new mutiny").

The second line of the first quatrain tells the audience that the play is set "in fair Verona." Shakespeare set thirteen of his thirty-eight plays either fully or partly in Italy.

Italy was considered an exotic location where most of the people in Shakespeare's audience had never been, except in their imaginations. The Elizabethans' perception of Italians was that they were clever, sometimes devious, sophisticated, and extremely passionate in love and war, which might explain why Shakespeare set six of his love stories in Italy.

The second quatrain identifies the "star-crossed lovers" as the central characters in the play. They fall in love ("take their life," meaning they start their love life), they're going to suffer serious problems ("misadventur'd piteous overthrows") because of their love for one another, and that they're going to die because of their parent's feud ("with their death, bury their parents' strife").

The third quatrain identifies the overall action of the play (the plot), which will focus on the star-cross'd lovers' "death-mark'd love," which they try to maintain in the midst of their parent's feud ("the continuance of their parents’ rage").

The Chorus informs the audience that the feud—and the play—will end only when the two lovers have died for their love ("Which, but their children's end, naught could remove").

In the couplet at the end of the sonnet, the Chorus tells the audience to sit back (those who paid extra for a seat) or stand quietly in front of the stage, try not to be too rowdy, and enjoy the play.

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According to the Prologue of William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" the feud between the two families will only end with the deaths (or actually the suicides) of the children of the two families who "with their death bury their parents' strife."

At the beginning of the story, the Montagues and the Capulets are sworn enemies.  But Romeo, son of the Montagues, and Juliet, daughter of the Capulets, will soon fall in love.

However, due largely to their families's disapproval of their love, the two end up killing themselves.  It is only with their deaths that the two families promise to end their fighting.

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