In "The Necklace" by Guy de Maupassant, some readers argue that Mathilde wasn't completely transformed during the ten years of her hard work to replace the necklace. Give two pieces of evidence...

In "The Necklace" by Guy de Maupassant, some readers argue that Mathilde wasn't completely transformed during the ten years of her hard work to replace the necklace. Give two pieces of evidence from the end of the story that show Mathilde  is still not a completely mature person. 

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lynn30k | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

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Mathilde, at the beginning of the story, is a beautiful, if shallow, young woman. She is married to a man she considers beneath her, and feels somewhat let down by life. When she and her husband are invited to a ball that is beyond what she could have hoped for, she is still not happy, as she will not have a dress or jewelry that others will envy. She borrows a diamond necklace from a friend, loses it, and she and her husband spend the next ten years working to pay off the loans they had to obtain in order to replace the necklace. Although she learns how to work hard at humble work during the ten years, she still shows her immaturity and shallowness. When by chance she finds Madame Forestier, who had loaned her the necklace, Mathilde tells her that  she, Madame Forestier, is to blame for Mathilde's aged, worn-out appearance. In fact, Mathilde is the one who lost a necklace she thought was extremely valuable. When Madame Forestier tells Mathilde that she had not noticed the replacement, Mathilde "smiled with a joy that was at once proud and ingenuous". She is still immature and prideful, despite her ten years of hard labor.

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