Animal Farm Questions and Answers
by George Orwell

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According to Napoleon, which animals achieve the truest happiness? (Chapter 10 of Animal Farm)

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Gretchen Mussey eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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In chapter 10, the farm has completely transformed into a highly-efficient machine while the standard of living ironically remains at an all-time low. Many of the younger animals on the farm have no concept of the true tenets of Animalism and are extremely ignorant, hard workers, which greatly benefits the ruling-class pigs. Even the windmill has been used for milling corn and turns a large profit, which is only shared among the pigs and does not benefit the other animals on the farm. The luxuries on the farm and Snowball's dream of creating a three-day work week are no longer discussed among the animals, who have completely abandoned their dreams of living easy, fulfilling lives, which is what originally inspired the Revolution. Apparently, Napoleon had denounced that such ideas were contrary to the spirit of Animalism, which the reader recognizes as completely false. Napoleon also states, "The truest happiness . . . lay in working hard and living frugally." Napoleon's comment is completely self-serving and is an example of how the ruling pigs manipulate the animals to embrace their lowly, depressing lives.

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bullgatortail eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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All of the animals once dreamed of obtaining the luxuries once enjoyed by the humans of George Orwell's Animal Farm. But these luxuries--such as the three-day week, electricity and hot-and-cold running water--were now disregarded. Napoleon pronounced that ideas such as these were

... contrary to the spirit of Animalism. The truest happiness, he said, lay in working hard and living frugally.

Of course, the animals could see that the farm had grown richer, but they--the non-pigs and non-dogs--had not received any of the benefits of the farm's growth. Perhaps, they thought, it was because of the larger number of dogs and pigs which now roamed Animal Farm.

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