According to Leon Trotsky, what was distinctive and specific about Russia's politics, economy, society and its history that caused a revolution to break out in 1917 here and not in any of the other...

According to Leon Trotsky, what was distinctive and specific about Russia's politics, economy, society and its history that caused a revolution to break out in 1917 here and not in any of the other European nations?

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teachsuccess eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Your answer can be found in Leon Trotsky's The History of the Russian Revolution. I've provided a link to his book below.

In his book, Trotsky explains what distinguished Russia from the other European nations and how those specific characteristics led to the Russian revolution. Here they are, in no particular order:

1) Russia had a substantial working-class (proletariat) population, compared to England or France. Trotsky tells us that 17th and 18th century England and France had modest populations (from 5 to 25 million), while Russia at the turn of the 20th century numbered about 150 million in population. The Russian working classes (about 25 million in all, inclusive of families) dwarfed those of the French and English.

2) Explosive developments in the manufacturing industry led to the Russian bourgeoisie forming profitable relationships with foreigners who infused capital into the Russian economy. Trotsky contends that, by 1905, Russian capitalist growth far outstripped that of even the United States.

For example, Trotsky maintains that large enterprises (employing more than 1,000 workers) hired more people in Russia than in the United States. These large entities employed 17.8% of workers in the United States and a whopping 41.4% of workers in Russia.

By the turn of the 20th century, the Russian bourgeoisie had strong connections to foreign-based venture capitalists; indeed, they were at the mercy of wealthy European banks. The monopoly of wealth was thus concentrated on a privileged few, and the entire Russian proletariat population was kept out of this economic paradigm. Thus, Russia, more than any other European country at the turn of the 20th century, was ripe for a tempestuous revolution. The proletariat populations were both politically and economically disenfranchised.

3) By 1905, Russian absolutism was concentrated in a draconian government, one that sanctioned state violence against workers. Factory strikes were forbidden, but the surge of soviet organizations led to the mobilization of proletariat workers. Meanwhile, neither France nor Germany's proletariat populations had access to this pivotal organizational advantage. Because of the soviet influence, Russian factory strikes rose from 25,000 strikers in 1904 to almost 3 million in 1905. The Russian revolution was partly made possible by the soviet advantage.

For more, please refer to the link below.

 

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