According to James Madison, political parties wereA. not likely to become influential until after the writers of the Constitution diedB. the organizations that would link citizens to governmentC. a...

According to James Madison, political parties were
A. not likely to become influential until after the writers of the Constitution died
B. the organizations that would link citizens to government
C. a dangerous version of factions
D. the organizations that would potentially develop policy agendas for the new American democracy
E. unlikely to become influential in American politics

 (I believe it is option C)

2 Answers | Add Yours

zihala's profile pic

zihala | College Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

C is the correct answer. James Madison feared factions - small groups in society that could have too much influence. He would have considered political parties and interest groups to both fall into that category. His thoughts on this can be found in Federalist Paper No. 10.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

You are correct.  Option C is the best answer to this question.  James Madison and the other Founding Fathers were very worried about the idea of “factions” and they worried that political parties would arise out of these factions.  This, they feared, would reduce the unity of the country.

Madison and others worried that America would split into factions.  They particularly worried about a split between the rich elites and the large masses of people who were not rich.  They were afraid that each of these groups would form a political party and the country would be divided.  They hoped that this would not happen, but they feared that it would.  They set up the Constitution in an effort to make it harder for any one faction to dominate.

So, you got this one right.  Option C is the best answer.

Sources:

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