According to Jackson, what were the potential beniefits of removal for Native Americans?

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By Jackson, I assume that you are referring to Andrew Jackson and the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Jackson, then president, paternalistically claimed that the displacement of Native Americans was essentially a philanthropic act and done in their own best interest.

In an 1830 letter to John Pitchlynn, Jackson wrote,

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By Jackson, I assume that you are referring to Andrew Jackson and the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Jackson, then president, paternalistically claimed that the displacement of Native Americans was essentially a philanthropic act and done in their own best interest.

In an 1830 letter to John Pitchlynn, Jackson wrote,

I beg of you to say to them, that their interest happiness peace & prosperity depends upon their removal beyond the jurisdiction of the laws of the State of Mississippi…but request that you make known to them that Congress to enable them to remove & comfortably to arrange themselves at their new homes has made liberal appropriations. It was a measure I had much at heart & sought to effect because I was satisfied that the Indians could not possibly live under the laws of the States. If now they shall refuse to accept the liberal terms offered, they only must be liable for whatever evils & difficulties may arise. I feel conscious of having done my duty to my red children and if any failure of my good intention arises, it will be attributable to their want of duty to themselves, not to me.

As you can see from this passage, one of the potential benefits he mentions are comfortable new homes on land west of the Mississippi River. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 did indeed provide some financial and material assistance to those who voluntarily and peacefully gave up their lands and made the move. Additionally, the law stipulated that these new communities were essentially under the protection of the United States government.

Most of Jackson’s statements regarding the 1830 act purport that he was actually saving Native Americans from extinction, because it was his understanding that they simply could not live under state and federal law or among white settlers and colonists. As you can see from the letter, Jackson thought he was taking care of his “red children” and accommodating them by providing them with a good deal (“liberal terms”).

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Andrew Jackson believed there would be some benefits for the Native Americans if they were removed from the lands on which they lived, which were located east of the Mississippi River. Andrew Jackson believed that the Native Americans were like children who needed guidance. He believed, as did many white Americans, that the people of the United States would not move to lands located west of the Mississippi River. If the Native Americans were removed to these western lands, it was believed that they would be able to live in peace and would be able to govern themselves. They also would be free from intimidation and harassment from white people who viewed the Native Americans as inferior to whites. They also would be safe from potential attack by settlers who wanted their land.

It turned out that many of these premises were false. White people expanded west of the Mississippi River, and they again wanted the lands on which the Native Americans lived.

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