A DNA template having the base sequence -U-C-U-A-C-U- what is the mRNA base sequence?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

This question is incorrect. There is no uracil in deoxyribonucleic acid. The nitrogenous bases in DNA are A, T, C, and G. Maybe the sequence you have is the actual messenger RNA sequence UCUACU. Therefore, working backwards, the DNA complementary strand would be A-G-A-T-G-A. The base pairing rules when messenger...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

This question is incorrect. There is no uracil in deoxyribonucleic acid. The nitrogenous bases in DNA are A, T, C, and G. Maybe the sequence you have is the actual messenger RNA sequence UCUACU. Therefore, working backwards, the DNA complementary strand would be A-G-A-T-G-A. The base pairing rules when messenger RNA copies the DNA template is as follows. If there is the base A (adenine) in the DNA, it pairs with U (uracil) in the messenger RNA. If there is a T(thymine) in the DNA, it pairs with adenine in the mRNA. If there is a C(cytosine)in the DNA, it pairs with guanine in the mRNA. Finally, if there is a G(guanine) in the DNA, it pairs with cytosine in the mRNA.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

A DNA template cannot actually have uracil (U) in the base sequence because it has thymine instead of uracil. If we assume this is an mRNA sequence, then we can write the DNA sequence. For mRNA to DNA, we always pair A with T/U or pair C and G. 

To find the complementary sequence, we look at each base and write its partner

-A-G-A-T-G-A-

For the complementary DNA strand. We can also write the complementary strand of tRNA which would look much like thias strand except replacing T with U since it is RNA. 

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team