9th grade American LiteratureHere we go again! :)The Last of the MohicansSelected stories from E.A. PoeThe Scarlet LetterSelected stories from O. HenryThe Call of the WildThe Adv. of Huckleberry...

9th grade American Literature

Here we go again! :)

The Last of the Mohicans
Selected stories from E.A. Poe
The Scarlet Letter
Selected stories from O. Henry
The Call of the Wild
The Adv. of Huckleberry Finn
The Old Man and the Sea
The Pearl

In addition, we work through a number of selections in Literature and the Language Arts, the American Tradition, textbook.

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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

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Saki and James Thurber are some classic old authors that might provide a lot of quality stories for your students. James Thurber is one who seems to be overlooked today, but his tales are well written and provide a lot of discussion with regard to character, plot, and surprises.

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Unless ninth graders are precocious, The Scarlet Letter demands more maturity, but it is a must as stated before.

Ninth-graders love To Kill a Mockingbird and it is a great maturation model as is Great Expectations.  [Showing the exposition in film first helps to motivate the readers.]  There are good abridged editions, if necessary.

Short stories:  "The Lady, or the Tiger?"  "The Gift of the Magi," "The Most Dangerous Game," "The Necklace,"  "The Piece of String" (Maupassant's story is an example of why not to lie), "Lonesome Boy, Silver Trumpet" by Arna Bontemps

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I loved teaching 9th grade!  In addition to Lord of the Flies, I taught Oedipus and Antigone, which they enjoyed.  Did I just miss Romeo and Juliet somewhere in this discussion--a classic freshman title.  Your short story list looks a lot like mine; I'd add "The Interlopers" by Saki (H.H. Munro) and "The White Circle" by John Bell Clayton, two of my favorites.  Got mixed reviews on "The Monkey's Paw" but I loved it; ditto for  Jack London's "To Build a Fire" and Roald Dahl's "The Landlady."  Heywood Braun's "The Fifty-first Dragon" is another good read.  Ahhh.  Makes me nostalgic for those days. 

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clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Selected stories from E.A. Poe - always a winner, with any class.

The Scarlet Letter - the language seems a little tough for 9th graders but I agree that it is a high school MUST READ.

The Adv. of Huckleberry Finn - great story and about the right reading level, most kids enjoy it, but miss the humor and the satire, I'm afraid.  Hard to teach the good lessons because so many go over the kids' heads.  Also, some teachers find it a bit difficult to read aloud due to the prominent use of the n-word.

The Old Man and the Sea - I refuse to teach this book.  It was painful in high school.  It was painful in college.  I imagine teaching it, for me, would also be painful.  A man and a fish.  Where is the excitement in that?

What about To Kill a Mockingbird??  This for me is MUST READ freshman book.

 

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ajmchugh | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

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Our district has American Lit in 11th grade, since so many of what most people describe as the "classics" deal with issues that are a little over the heads of lots of 9th graders.  (Streetcar, The Scarlet Letter, etc.)  However, my Honors 9th graders read The Pearl and Of Mice and Men as their summer reading and they do really well with it. 

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Again, The Scarlet Letter seems a bit ambitious from my prospective for Grade 9 students. How do you find that goes down with your students, especially the somewhat prolix first chapter? The Pearl is a GREAT book for this grade though - really accessible.

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mrerick | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

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My district uses the Prentice Hall Elements of Lit. series for 9-12 English. I haven't taught 9th grade English, so I'm not familiar with the reading list. However, I wish we had the freedom you have to choose what we teach. We have a "protected reading" list for each grade level and cannot deviate from it. I can't use any of the stories listed in post #2 because they are not on our list. (I have to admit that sometimes I cheat by going backwards. If my 10th graders didn't cover something I like from the 9th grade list, I can teach that; but I don't dare go forward and try to use The Crucible, which is on the 11th grade list.)

I am pretty lucky that way.  Our high school only has two English teachers; I teach 9th, 10th and half of 12th - the other one teaches 11th and half of 12th.  We have middle school certifieds that teach 7th and 8th for us. 

Because there is only two of us, we have pretty free range to choose what we what as long as we stay away from each other's favorites.  She can't have LOTF, OMAM, or GOW, and I have to stay away from TKAM.  The great part about splitting our seniors is that we can both choose whatever from all of British Literature without stepping on toes. 

One of the great benefits of teaching in a small town, I suppose.

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linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

My district uses the Prentice Hall Elements of Lit. series for 9-12 English. I haven't taught 9th grade English, so I'm not familiar with the reading list. However, I wish we had the freedom you have to choose what we teach. We have a "protected reading" list for each grade level and cannot deviate from it. I can't use any of the stories listed in post #2 because they are not on our list. (I have to admit that sometimes I cheat by going backwards. If my 10th graders didn't cover something I like from the 9th grade list, I can teach that; but I don't dare go forward and try to use The Crucible, which is on the 11th grade list.)

mrerick's profile pic

mrerick | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted on

Our 9th grade doesn't really have a title to it - I'm pretty much free to teach what I want without having to fit it into a mold (which is really good because I tend to ignore the "world lit" portion of 10th grade English!).  With my freshmen, we study Animal Farm, Edith Hamilton's Mythology, The Odyssey, Watership Down, Romeo and Juliet, a fantastic collection of short stories (I will list below), and Lord of the Flies (which I stole from the 8th grade teacher because I really like it and I've been here longer!).  Our short story unit includes Most Dangerous Game, Lady or the Tiger, Cask of Amontillado, Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Scarlet Ibis, The Necklace, and Gift of the Magi.  These are all in the Adventures in Reading book by Holt - wonderful collection.

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