A 75- Ω lossless transmission line is interfaced to a load impedance that consists of a series connected resistor of 30 Ω and a capacitor of 10 pF. At an operating frequency of 2 GHz and for a...

A 75- Ω lossless transmission line is interfaced to a load impedance that consists of a series connected resistor of 30 Ω and a capacitor of 10 pF. At an operating frequency of 2 GHz and for a wavelength of 10 cm:

a) Find the reflection coefficient at the load

b) Find the standing wave ratio

c) Find the position of the voltage maximum nearest the load, and

d) Find the position of the current maximum nearest the load.

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Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

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While eNotes doesn't have the format for solving you engineering problem for you, we can help you by clarifying the concepts you are working with. Once you better understand the concepts you are being asked about, you can better apply the mathematical equations of electrical engineering and audio engineering to determine the required information.

Lossless transmission line: a lossless line differs from a lossy line (having significant loss) in that the circuit of a transmission has just the elements of inductance level per length (LL) and capacitance per length (CL), and these are uniformly distributed down the length of the line.

Load impedance: electrical impedance is the opposition a circuit presents when voltage is applied and represents the complex ratio of voltage to current when operating in an Alternating Current, called an AC current.

Reflection coefficient: the reflection coefficient describes the reflection (r) at every point (z) along a lossless transmission line.

Standing wave ration (SWR): a measure of the match of impedance of loads with characteristic impedance of lines; a mismatch creates standing waves along transmission lines.

Voltage maximum and current maximum: voltage and current describe the voltage and phase of the voltage and current at any point (z) along the transmission line finding V(z) and I(z).

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