In the excerpt from The Autobiography, Ben Franklin places temperance first on his list of virtues. What two specific things does Franklin say to do with temperance?

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I am assuming you are referring to Chapter IX of Franklin's autobiography, the chapter in which he sets forth his plan for attaining moral perfection. He places temperance at the very top of his list. 

He discusses what others mean by the term, for some, temperance only in the consumption...

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I am assuming you are referring to Chapter IX of Franklin's autobiography, the chapter in which he sets forth his plan for attaining moral perfection. He places temperance at the very top of his list. 

He discusses what others mean by the term, for some, temperance only in the consumption of food and drink, while others have defined it more broadly to include other pleasurable activities, mental and physical.  Franklin chooses to define it as only temperance as to food and drink.  The other place in the chapter in which he discusses temperance is when he is carrying on a hypothetical conversation with his descendants, referring to himself in the third person. Here, he says,

To Temperance he ascribes his long-continued health, and what is still left to him of a good constitution....

(I apologize for not including a page number, but the on-line version I looked at is not paginated.) Since he lived to be 84 years old, it may very well be that he was correct!

 

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