In To Kill a Mockingbird, like her father, Scout generally assumes that most people are good-hearted.  How is this aspect of her character developed?I have to find 6 quotes of scout implying that...

In To Kill a Mockingbird, like her father, Scout generally assumes that most people are good-hearted.  How is this aspect of her character developed?

I have to find 6 quotes of scout implying that most people are kind hearted and im having a really hard time. Any help would be great, thanks!

Asked on by bcoates

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lhc | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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Early in the novel, Scout's naive reaction to the mob accosting her father outside the town jail gives the reader a sense of her innocent view of human nature, as she strikes up a friendly conversation with Walter Cunningham's father.  She mentions what a nice boy Walter is, and casually inquires whether Mr. Cunningham's "entailment" (his debt to her father) is coming along.  This is enough to remind Mr. Cunningham that Atticus has been very good to him; the mob mentality is broken, and Atticus surreptiously wipes away a tear when he realizes that his daughter may have saved his life, or Tom Robinson's, or both.

Probably the most telling aspect of Scout's character, as well as her father's, occurs at the end of the novel after the incident with Bob Ewell.  As Atticus is tucking Scout into bed, she is fighting back sleep as she relates to him the plot of a book called The Gray Ghost.  This that story, a character is wrongly accused of a crime, pursued as a criminal, then finally proven innocent. 

“When they finally saw him, why he hadn’t done any of those things . . . Atticus, he was real nice. . . .” His hands were under my chin, pulling up the cover, tucking it around me. “Most people are, Scout, when you finally see them.”

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