In Brave New World, Huxley seems to deplore the relationship between the media, celebrities, and media consumers. Compare the predicament of the "savage" to the way our media excesses victimize...

In Brave New World, Huxley seems to deplore the relationship between the media, celebrities, and media consumers. Compare the predicament of the "savage" to the way our media excesses victimize some people, and discuss when the right to privacy is more important than the right of free access to information?

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The history of the exploitation of movie stars is an old one, dating back to such child stars as Judy Garland, who was given drugs to keep her alert and energetic. When stars were under contracts with the Hollywood studios such as Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios (MGM), Universal, and RKO, they were made to work long hours and make movie after movie, as well as perform for advertising shorts, make publicity photos, appearances, etc. In contemporary times,clebrities are not treated in this manner, yet, the paparazzi is so aggressive that they take pictures of celebrities anywhere and anytime, as well as their children.

Perhaps, the celebrity who most resembles the Savage is Alec Baldwin, who is fierce when reporters persist in taking photos or ask him prying questions. Once Baldwin grabbed a camera and broke it in his rage, much like John the Savage when he kicks The Hourly Radio reporter in his rear end. Other stars have also been known to lose their tempers with the media. Once, an irate Julia Roberts approached photographers outside her children's school, demanding that they not take pictures of her children. In fact, the protection of the children of celebrities has now become a real issue as magazines are now being asked not to publish them.

When celebrities do attempt to get away in anonymity, there are hounded and spied upon. In a recent edition of the magazine Allure, Victoria Beckman says that she and her husband David (famous soccer player) like to go to restaurants where they can enter and exit through an unknown back door. This problem resembles that of the helicopter landing with all the bystanders who want a piece of John.

They were all crying together and intoxicated by the noise, the unanimity, that sense of rhythmical atonement, they might, it seemed, be the scene of rhythmical atonement, they might, it seemed, gone on for hours--almost indefinitely.

This spying and visiting goes on for a day until someone resembling Lenina gets off and John the Savage loses control, and around midnight helicopters converge upon him.

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