4- What are the best parts of the book? Why? What are your least favorite parts of the book? Why4- What are the best parts of the book? Why? What are your least favorite parts of the book? Why

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amy-lepore's profile pic

amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I love the chase scenes when Montag is running from the mechanical beast.  It's thrilling and I don't want him to get caught since I've learned to like him.  I also like the parts where Montag is "awakening"--with Claire and Faber and the book people at the end.

linda-allen's profile pic

linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

I am a high school English teacher who (honestly) never got around to reading that book until last week, when I picked it up off the shelf and decided to give it a try.  To be completely frank, I was disappointed.  I thought it was going to be a thrilling work of science fiction along the lines of Orwell's 1984, or some of the more modern and equally good (in my opinion) sci-fi/futuristic books like Uglies and The Hunger Games.  Instead, I found Fahrenheit to be alternatingly preachy, overly wordy, and downright dull.

I say it was preachy, specifically in the scenes where Beatty would explain things to Montag and the reader.  These sequences often got overly wordy for me, too, and I found myself skimming a lot as I read.  I thought the characters were lacking in a quality that made me concerned about their well-being; by the end, I really didn't care if Montag lived or died, as long as the book ended one way or another.  Also, unlike other novels of that genre, I was not left wishing for a sequel at the end, as I usually am.

So I guess, to answer your question plainly, I think the worst parts are the parts where Captain Beatty preaches to Montag.  The best parts are probably the conversations between Montag and Faber, and then the escape scene.

If you were disappointed with the book, then you should stay away from the movie--unless you want a good laugh. The costumes and vehicles and other props are really ridiculous. It would be interesting to do a comparative study of the two.

jessecreations's profile pic

jessecreations | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted on

I am a high school English teacher who (honestly) never got around to reading that book until last week, when I picked it up off the shelf and decided to give it a try.  To be completely frank, I was disappointed.  I thought it was going to be a thrilling work of science fiction along the lines of Orwell's 1984, or some of the more modern and equally good (in my opinion) sci-fi/futuristic books like Uglies and The Hunger Games.  Instead, I found Fahrenheit to be alternatingly preachy, overly wordy, and downright dull.

I say it was preachy, specifically in the scenes where Beatty would explain things to Montag and the reader.  These sequences often got overly wordy for me, too, and I found myself skimming a lot as I read.  I thought the characters were lacking in a quality that made me concerned about their well-being; by the end, I really didn't care if Montag lived or died, as long as the book ended one way or another.  Also, unlike other novels of that genre, I was not left wishing for a sequel at the end, as I usually am.

So I guess, to answer your question plainly, I think the worst parts are the parts where Captain Beatty preaches to Montag.  The best parts are probably the conversations between Montag and Faber, and then the escape scene.

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