In 1984, Orwell’s totalitarian state rebellion is controlled to eradicate heroic notions of freedom.  How would I substatiate this statement?When the book was written, Hitler, Mussolini, and...

In 1984, Orwell’s totalitarian state rebellion is controlled to eradicate heroic notions of freedom.  How would I substatiate this statement?

When the book was written, Hitler, Mussolini, and Stalin had forms of totalitarian governments so I am trying to tie these together with Orwell's 1984.  THANK-YOU!!!

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amymc | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

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In Part Three, O'Brien addresses some of these notions in talking with the captive Winston.  First, he denies the notion that totalitarian regimes are really working for the good of the people.  He notes emphatically,

We are not interested in the good of others; we are interested solely in power. Not wealth or luxury or long life or happiness: only power, pure power.

Winston recalls reading Goldstein's supposed book (written in part by O'Brien) which notes that making people public martyrs for rebelling gives them power.  Having people vanish, or suffer alone, strips the power of public worship away.  In this, he notes that other totalitarian regimes have failed:

All the others, even those who resembled ourselves, were cowards and hypocrites. The German Nazis and the Russian Communists came very close to us in their methods, but they never had the courage to recognize their own motives.

He continues by returning to one of the mottos of the state:  Freedom is Slavery. Then he reverses it "Slavery is Freedom," forcing Winsont to notice his own degenerate state which he "earned" by rebelling. While Winston had believed that the spirit of man would previal, O'Brien's image of a boot stomping on a human face, is the more likely in this society.

 

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