In "1984" by George Orwell, what simile is used to place Julia's coarse remarks about the Inner Party into a natural response?

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dymatsuoka | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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When Winston first begins his relationship with Julia, he is "astonished" by the "open jeering hatred...(and) the coarseness of her language" when she speaks about the Party.  She seems "unable to mention the Party, and especially the Inner Party, without using the kind of words that you (see) chalked up in dripping alleyways".  At first taken aback, Winston soon realizes that her coarse remarks are

"merely one symptom of her revolt against the Party and all its ways, and somehow it seem(s) natural and healthy, like the sneeze of a horse that smells bad hay".

Julia's coarse comments are a natural expression of the hatred she holds for the Inner Party; just as a horse sneezes as an automatic reaction to something that smells bad, Julia automatically swears when thinking about the monstrous organization she despises (Part II, Chapter 2).

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