In the 1930s, to what kind of diseases were people exposed?

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I think that most of what caused national health issues in the 1930s had to revolve around how to pay for health care.  The crippling economic reality of the time period played a major role in receiving health care, how one received it, and whether or not one could engage...

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I think that most of what caused national health issues in the 1930s had to revolve around how to pay for health care.  The crippling economic reality of the time period played a major role in receiving health care, how one received it, and whether or not one could engage in preventive medicene.  At the same time, the funding for health care initiatives was severely limited as resources were extremely limited at the time.  Both of these realities fed into the health problems of the nation at the time:  "In the first three years of the 1930s the leading causes of death were 1) heart disease, 2) cancer, 3) pneumonia, and 4) infectious and parasitic diseases, including influenza, tuberculosis, and syphilis."  As represented by President Roosevelt, polio was still a challenge in America.  The struggle to find a cure for polio took significant form in this time period, setting the stage for what would be discovered later.

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