1700's History QuestionWhat events and ideas between 1763 and 1775 led to the desire of many Americans to pursue independence by 1776?

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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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1763 marked the final treaty ending the French and Indian War, also called the Seven Years War, which involved Great Britain and France (and the Indian nations generally allied with France) fighting over the question of control of territories in New England and Canada.

The conclusion of the fighting left England with a greatly increased national debt. In order to raise money to pay off these debts, Parliament enacted a series of taxes to be levied against the colonists. Some colonists were enraged by this "taxation without representation" since they had no voice in the Parliament.

Some of the taxes were indirect, levied as extensions of previous taxes on goods imported or exported from the colonies. The Stamp Tax Act of 1765 directly taxed all paper documents and items used in the colonies. In response to the outrage of the colonists, Parliament repealed the Stamp Act but affirmed its authority to levy taxes as it felt necessary in the Declaratory Act of 1766.

The Townshend Acts of 1767 imposed taxes on a number of goods imported to the colonies. Boycotts of English wares were first organized in response to these acts. The Boston Tea Party took place in 1773 in response to the tax on tea that had been imposed.

In 1774, the Intolerable Acts restricted the authority of the Massachusetts colonial government, required British soldiers accused of crimes in the colonies to be tried in Britain, closed the Boston port until the British government received compensation for the tea destroyed the previous year, and announced that colonials would be required to provide housing and food for British soldiers.

Many other events and circumstances contributed to the final outbreak of the rebellion. These are some legislative and financial landmark events.

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