10th Grade British LiteratureYou get the idea! :)BeowulfMacbethThe Pilgrim's ProgressPride and PrejudiceIvanhoeGreat ExpectationsJane EyreThe Complete Stalky & Co.The Code of the WoostersThe...

10th Grade British Literature

You get the idea! :)

Beowulf
Macbeth
The Pilgrim's Progress
Pride and Prejudice
Ivanhoe
Great Expectations
Jane Eyre
The Complete Stalky & Co.
The Code of the Woosters
The Fellowship of the Ring

The posts so far have been wonderful, and I appreciate the new ideas and suggestions!  It's also nice to hear what other teachers experience (or have to deal with) in the schools where they teach.

Thanks Everyone! :)

10 Answers | Add Yours

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

In response to #10, amy-lepore, do you prefer to teach The Picture of Dorian Gray? And can you tell me a bit more about this film Pact with the Devil? I am going to be teaching this book for the first time next year to Grade 12, so would be interested to receive any tips!

amy-lepore's profile pic

amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

British Lit is reserved for 12th grade where I am...thank goodness!  It's my favorite, and I love teaching seniors--so many more films with which I am allowed supplement the eras and literature.

However, one of my all-time FAVES is The Picture of Dorian Gray--it would be great for both Brit Lit AND the Search for Identity themes.  There is a new film called Pact with the Devil I show, but for 10th grade, I would go with the black and white version with Angela Lansbury as Sybil.  The book is awesome--a pyschological experiment with a young and handsome fellow who becomes corrupt but only his portrait shows the extent of his wild and horrid life while he remains untarnished and beautiful.  It's great to pull in our own society's opinion of who is and who isn't beautiful and our stereotypical viewpoints. 

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Jamie Wheeler | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted on

I taught 10th English one year and loved the topic:  The Female Protagonist.  We began with Antigone and ended with Amy Tan; as I recall, it also inclued Maya Angelou, Barabara Kingsolver, and Julia Alvarez. (It was an honors course, to be fair.)

I also taught SGGK with great success.  The first thing we did I was worried about, it seemed so elementary-school to me, but the girls (all girls school) loved it!  They made their family crests with their personal mottos on them and we hung them all over the room.  The parents were tickled when they saw the descriptions the girls choose for themselves and their families.  It got everyone less scared and we had a good time, too. 

 

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malibrarian | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

For British Literature, I'd suggest using Sir Gawain and the Green Night in conjunction with Beowulf.  I've found that the students love the intrigue of the Gawain as the guest of Bercilak and paramour of his wife, and are particularly fond of the suprise twist ending.  Using both provides wonderful comparisons for a discussion of bravery, heroism, and morality.

That would be an interesting tie-in, also discussing the idea of hospitality which was so important during these times.  We read Beowulf with the Anglo-Saxon unit, then cover SGGK with the Medieval unit, but I can definitely go back and tie the two together in class discussions.  Thanks!!

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malibrarian | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

I wish I had your freedom!!! We use the Prentice Hall lit. book, which really doesn't have any kind of theme for 10th grade. Senior English is Brit. Lit.; junior English is Amer. Lit; but sophomore English is a jumble; I guess you could call it world lit.

I teach by genre and use the textbook very sparingly. But I'm not free to bring in any resource that is not on our "protected reading list." I start with Greek mythology because Antigone is on the 10th grade list. I'd love to include Oedipus Rex with it, but I can't because it's on our 12th grade list! And how on earth do I go from Julius Caesar to The Andromeda Strain?????? Arghhhhhhh!

Wow, that is nuts!  Our Classical Literature, which is 12th grade at our school, studies the Iliad and the Odyssey first semester, then goes through lots of Greek plays 2nd semester - plays by Aeschylus, Euripides, Sophocles, and one by Aristophanes. Then we end with the Aeneid and poems by Catullus.

I can't imagine trying to do Antigone without Oedipus Rex.  Can you do a selection from OR, just to get the ball rolling with Antigone?

You have my sympathies!!!!! :)

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sullymonster | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

For British Literature, I'd suggest using Sir Gawain and the Green Night in conjunction with Beowulf.  I've found that the students love the intrigue of the Gawain as the guest of Bercilak and paramour of his wife, and are particularly fond of the suprise twist ending.  Using both provides wonderful comparisons for a discussion of bravery, heroism, and morality.

linda-allen's profile pic

linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

I wish I had your freedom!!! We use the Prentice Hall lit. book, which really doesn't have any kind of theme for 10th grade. Senior English is Brit. Lit.; junior English is Amer. Lit; but sophomore English is a jumble; I guess you could call it world lit.

I teach by genre and use the textbook very sparingly. But I'm not free to bring in any resource that is not on our "protected reading list." I start with Greek mythology because Antigone is on the 10th grade list. I'd love to include Oedipus Rex with it, but I can't because it's on our 12th grade list! And how on earth do I go from Julius Caesar to The Andromeda Strain?????? Arghhhhhhh!

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allyson | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Assistant Educator

Posted on

I currently teach 10th grade English, our course is entitled "Search for Identity," and includes The Catcher in the Rye, Of Mice and Men, Macbeth, A Raisin In the Sun, and Tale of Two Cities. I used to teach 11th grade Brit Lit, which covered everything from Beowulf to Waiting for Godot. Although I really enjoy British Literature, I enjoy working with the sophomore more than the juniors. I find them more open to interesting and interactive lessons and less stressed about college and life after high school.

malibrarian's profile pic

malibrarian | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

I think 10th grade is my favorite, too - not just the fact that it's Brit Lit which is my favorite subject, but also just that age-group.  This year I have three boys in my class - that's it, three boys, all of whom thought Beowulf was the most wonderful thing since sliced bread...and now think they're going to die horrible convulsive deaths if I make them read Pride and Prejudice! :)  It's a lot of fun!

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mrerick | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted on

I LOVE teaching 10th grade.  Technically, I'm supposed to be teaching World Literature, but since I don't really like much World Lit (and nobody is looking over my shoulder), we do a lot of American novel in 10th grade.  It works fairly well because our 11th grade teacher sticks more to poetry, short story, and political essays in her American Lit class, so I'm free to use a ton of American novel choices (just not TKAM - she'd probably get me fired if I even tried to steal that one!).

We use Julius Caesar, Grapes of Wrath, Of Mice and Men, Huck Finn and Separate Peace.  In the years when our other units go more quickly, I'll do a brief short story unit using Leiningen Versus the Ants, The Monkey's Paw, The Storyteller, Neighbor Rosicky, The Bet and The Piece of Yarn, but typically I don't get that far.

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