i just need short answers for the following question from One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest 1. Why is McMurphy trying to drawl the patients out of the fog? 2. Explain in your own words why the...

 i just need short answers for the following question from One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

1. Why is McMurphy trying to drawl the patients out of the fog?

2. Explain in your own words why the Chief believes that the combine has not broken Mcmurphy?

3. McMurphy asks Billy Bibbit why he chooses to  stay in the hospital when he could be outside driving a convertible and romancing pretty girls, why does Billy stay?

4. Why does Nurse Ratched choose to keep McMurphy on the ward to prevent him from attaining the status of a martyr?

5. Why does Nurse Ratched take away the tub/card room?What happens after she does?

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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1. In the opening chapter of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, the half-Indian, "Broom" Bromden describes a fog machine that is "snowing down cold and white all over me like skim milk, so thick I might  even be able to hide in it if they didn't have a hold on me." Then the image changes to that of a bluetick hound that howls in a fog, frightened because he is unable to see and there are no tracks except those of his own feet; in every direction he smells nothing but his own tracks and his fear is "burning down into him like steam."

Bromden feels like this bluetick hound--lost, confused, in a fog of bewilderment and fear. When McMurphy comes into the ward, he quickly notices that the men are intimidated by Nurse Ratched, who plays upon their fears, rather than enabling the men to overcome their discomfort. McMurphy tries to get the men to come out of this fog of emasculation and assert themselves as men rather than allowing themselves to be subjects of social regimentation.

2. The Combine, the oppressive forces of the system that demand conformity from men in a machine-like nature, has not broken McMurphy because although he begins to conform to the rules after he learns that the Big Nurse can have him retained in the institution or even be given a lobotomy, he continues to annoy her by

...hollering up and down the hall, laughing at the black boys, frustrating the whole staff, and step up to the Big Nurse...and ask her just what was the inch by inch measurement of them great big ol'breasts....

Further, he is so angered by the death of Cheswick that he smashes through the immaculate plate glass of the hurses' station, demanding his cigarettes.

3. When McMurphy questions Billy as to why he remains committed instead of driving around with young women, Billy responds that he does not have the "guts." He tells McMurphy, "I'm not big and tough" he tells McMurphy, and he runs down the hall away from the other men.

4. Nurse Ratched keeps McMurphy on the floor rather than prevent him from becoming a matryr and bides her time until another opportunity presents itself. In this way, she can prove her superiority and have the satisfaction of humiliating McMurphy.

5. In Part II, Chapter 8, Nurse Ratched tells the men that she is removing the privilege of playing cards in the tub room because they failed to perform their house duties when they asked to watch the World Series. Consequently, they will no longer be able to play cards in the tub room, a privilege that was granted. After she does this,the other men turn to look at McMurphy. Then, he tips his cap, and he slaps his hands upon his knees and stands up. With a determined step he approaches the Nurse, who looks at him. McMurphy stretches, then begins to march toward her;however, he stops and tells her how he could use one of his cigarettes. Then, he smashes the glass and pokes his hand to where the cigarettes rest. After this, McMurphy calmly sits down and  says to the Big Nurse,

I'm sure sorry ma'am...Gawd but I am. That window glass was so spick and span I comp-pletely forgot it was there.

Sources:

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