1.What is normative political philosophy? Briefly give normative arguments for and against decriminalizing and/or legalizing sex work. 2.Why is Hobbes’s Social Contract Theory a sort of proto-liberalism? Explain.

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Normative political philosophy focuses on how things should be. This contrasts with empirical political philosophy, which has to do with how things currently are. There could be several different things you could look at when thinking about decriminalizing sex work. For example, you could look at liberalism and free choice,...

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Normative political philosophy focuses on how things should be. This contrasts with empirical political philosophy, which has to do with how things currently are. There could be several different things you could look at when thinking about decriminalizing sex work. For example, you could look at liberalism and free choice, as well as sex work being empowering for some people who choose to make a living this way. There are also benefits that you could look at if sex work was legalized in an ideal way, being that there could be regulations introduced to protect workers as well as ensure that they have a safe environment in which to work. The included link goes over several different ways that political philosophers propose that legalization of sex work ought to be implemented.

Hobbes's Social Contract Theory is the belief that our moral or political obligations are related to the society in which we live. This is to say that you "owe" certain behavior to the group you are a part of in order to benefit from it. An example could be voting in order to have the proper protections by the government. Proto-liberalism has to do with the government being reflective of the interests of individuals living in society. Therefore, you can see the connection between social contract theory and proto-liberalism: individuals need to participate in the government in order to create a political environment that reflects their views.

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