Juno hates the Trojan for several reasons, and torments and foils them whenever she can. Does this enmity seem to have any legitimate basis?   1.Juno hates the trojan for several reasons, and...

Juno hates the Trojan for several reasons, and torments and foils them whenever she can. Does this enmity seem to have any legitimate basis?

 

1.Juno hates the trojan for several reasons, and terments and foils them whenever she can. Does this enmity seem to have any legitimate basis?

 

Expert Answers
Ashley Kannan eNotes educator| Certified Educator

In my mind, the short answer is that Hera really lacks any solid justification behind her disdain for the Trojans.  I see her as part of Homer's thematic purpose, and what I consider to be one of the strongest parts to the work.  For Homer, his conceptualization of gods is that of mortals, while he presents mortals in a manner that makes them gods.  He gives mortals such as Hector situations that could only be navigated through divine intervention.  Wrath and anger along with brilliant skill is embodied through Achilles.  Yet, Homer reflects the gods not as divine beings as much as individuals with set agendas and axes to grind.  I am reminded of the closing scene in Kursoawa's film, "Ran," where the jester is sitting with the dead King on the battlefield asking the gods if human beings are their "little play things to occupy their time."  I see the gods shown in Homer to be much of the same.  Hera's anger is motivated by her own political agenda of supporting her own territories that pay homage to her and to her own sense of jealousy at Aphrodite being named by Paris as the "fairest."  It seems that Hera, and the other Olympians, interfere in the world of the humans to satisfy and satiate their own mortal tendencies.