1.Hymen repture is considered as the important sign to confirm the lose of "virginity",what are the other signs that should be considered ?As with "hymen rupture" in females,  is there any sign to...

1.Hymen repture is considered as the important sign to confirm the lose of "virginity",what are the other signs that should be considered ?

As with "hymen rupture" in females,  is there any sign to consider in males ?

Asked on by balpreet

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boblawrence | (Level 1) Associate Educator

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The hymen is a ring of membranous tissue with a small central opening.  It is situated just behind the labia, at the mouth of the vagina.

During first-time sexual intercourse the ring is dilated and usually torn, sometimes causing pain and bleeding.  With repeated intercourse and maturation of the genitalia, the hymen disappears completely.  A patient at this stage is somewhat presumptively described as having a “marital” vagina.

There is a normal variation in hymenal configuration, and those engaging in pediatric sexual assault examinations must be aware of these variants.

Injuries other than hymenal tears are not usually seen following consensual first-time sex.  In forced sexual assault, however, there may be bruising, abrasion or splits of the vaginal and labial tissues, or peri-vaginal or peri-anal skin.  In this situation such injuries, in addition to hymenal rupture, would be signs of penetration or so called loss of virginity.

In males there is no reliable sign of loss of virginity, unless there has been rough forced sexual assault, in which case there may be injury to the male genitalia.

Finally, in a mature woman of reproductive age who is a virgin, the hymen may be completely absent such that she would falsely appear to have lost her virginity.  This is because the hymen can be torn during vigorous sports and masturbatory activity, and, even in the absence of these activities, has a tendency to involute over time.

The reference defines the hymen, and gives schematic diagrams showing the normal variants of hymenal anatomy.

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