1. coniferous trees have narrow, pointed leaves(needles), covered by a waxy coating,how these leaves help them to deal with climate in boreal forest2. exaplain why this strategy (the tall grasses...

1. coniferous trees have narrow, pointed leaves(needles), covered by a waxy coating,how these leaves help them to deal with climate in boreal forest

2. exaplain why this strategy (the tall grasses and the deciduous trees would not be well adapted to an arctic area because they don’t withstand low temperatures and they also cannot minimize water loss during the dry winter) would be a good strategy in grassland and temperate deciduous forest, but not in tropical forest.

Asked on by helwa56

1 Answer | Add Yours

trophyhunter1's profile pic

trophyhunter1 | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Coniferous forests do indeed contain narrow pointed leaves. By reducing the surface area of the leaf(as compared to large broad leaves as found in a tropical rainforest), there is little water loss due to transpiration through the stomates found in the needles. Because the ground is frozen in the cold, northern forests in winter, the ability to absorb water by the tree  roots is diminished. Being able to retain whatever water is inside the tree is important during the months when moisture isn't readily available.

Grasslands are fairly dry most of the year. Again, reducing leaves to the size of a blade of grass cuts down on water loss when droughts or dry periods occur. In temperate deciduous forests, rather than have needles like in coniferous forests, the leaves are rather broad, as in oaks or maples. However, these fall off during autumn thus preventing water loss by transpiration. This keeps the tree alive until the spring time, which brings rain again.

In a tropical rainforest, because it may rain several times a day, every day, water is not a limiting factor. Therefore, most tropical plants have very large, broad leaves. These contain many stomates and while a lot of transpiration occurs, the water that is lost, is quickly replaced whenever it rains again.

We’ve answered 318,935 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question