1. Analyze the origin and the meaning of trade in gold and slaves in the making of early modern sub-Saharan Africa. 2. Identify the ways in which the history of Algeria and the history of South...

1. Analyze the origin and the meaning of trade in gold and slaves in the making of early modern sub-Saharan Africa.

2. Identify the ways in which the history of Algeria and the history of South Africa are different in 1800-1870?

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mrkirschner | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

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  1. The gold and slave trade was a very lucrative business in sub-Saharan Africa, the Maghreb, and Arabia. The earliest wealth gained by this trade for sub-Saharan Africa was earned by the Kingdom of Ghana. The kingdom did not necessarily become wealthy on the mining of gold or selling of slaves itself as much as it did by controlling the southern end of the Saharan trade routes. It also controlled routes to the Mediterranean Sea. Sundiata conquered Ghana and expanded the territories to include gold mines for the Kingdom of Mali. The trade routes changed, but Mali still profited from the new ones. So profitable in fact, that one of its leaders, Mansa Musa, is arguably one of the wealthiest men to ever live. This gold and slave trade introduced sub-Saharan Africans to the religion of Islam and great Islamic kingdoms flourished for centuries in Africa.

  1. The English colonized South Africa, while the French colonized Algeria. The period 1800-1870 was different for these two countries. During this time, the French had managed to colonize Algeria and thousands of French are migrating to the Mediterranean state.  The opposite is true in South Africa where an African warrior king, Shaka, would not even permit Europeans into his territories. After Shaka’s assassination, the Zulus would control the area that is now northeast South Africa until the 1870s. Further south in the Cape Colony, the Dutch lost control of the state to the British and the two groups were at political odds with one another until the Dutch moved inland.
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