1.0698 divided by 0.001

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lemjay's profile pic

lemjay | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

> To determine the quotient, perform long division.

`0.001 |bar( 1.0698 )`

> Note that in long division, the divisor should be a whole number. So move the decimal point of the divisor three places to the right.

   `0.001` becomes `0001` or `1`

Since, we moved the decimal point in the divisor three places to the right, do the same to the dividend.

   `1.0698` becomes `1069.8`

> Then, we have:

      `1 |bar(1069.8)`

> Divide.

      `1069.8`

   `1` `|bar(1069.8) `         

  `-`  `1`                      

     `------`

      `00`                

   `-`   `0`       

   ` ------`

        `06`

   `-`     `6`

   `------`

          `09`

   `-`       `9`

   `-------`

            `08`

   `-`         `8`

  `-------`

          `0`

Hence, `1.0698 -:0.001 = 1069.8` .

embizze's profile pic

embizze | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Evaluate `1.0698 -: 0.001`

(1) Using long division -- the divisor is 0.001, and the dividend is 1.0698

To use long division, it is usually simplest to make the divisor a whole number. In order to do this, you move the decimal point right as many times as needed ( this is equivalent to multiplying by a power of 10). In order to do this, you must also move the decimal point of the dividend the same number of places to the right.

To make 0.001 a whole number, move the decimal 3 places to the right. Then you must also move the decimal of the dividend 3 places to the right yielding 1069.8

The long division is then :

          ----------
 0.001| 1.0698      ==> which then becomes:

         1069.8
         -----------
       1|1069.8

And the quotient is 1069.8

(2) If you recognize 0.001 as a power of 10 there is an easier method. Multiply divisor and dividend by the power of 10 needed to make the divisor 1; in this case multiply both by 1000 (moving the decimal 3 places to the right) giving the same answer.
      

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