The Wings of the Morning

Underlying nearly all relationships, personal and otherwise, in sleepy Pequot Landing is the feud between the Grimeses and the Talcotts. These powerful families have given both joy and sorrow to seventeen-year-old Georgiana Ross, the miller’s daughter. Friends for years with Richard St. John (Sinjin) Grimes and employed by Bobby Talcott, Georgiana must also reckon with the hatred of her father, Tom, for both families. Indeed, Tom Ross seems to hate everyone. Protecting her mother and four younger siblings from his insane rages is another of Georgie’s worries, which increase when two of her closest friends, a daughter of the Talcotts and a Grimes boy, elope.

Behind the tragedies and triumphs of Georgie and the other citizens of Pequot Landing lurks the threat of a clash of colossal proportions. Tryon builds his foundation slowly but skillfully, entwining the reader in the events of his peripheral characters’ lives while, nearly unnoticed, the larger tale unfolds.

Tryon is a good storyteller. This particular book, however, would have benefitted from a careful proofread and a skilled editor. Although an improvement over THE NIGHT OF THE MOONBOW, the character development of THE WINGS OF THE MORNING suffers from an excess of authorial contrivance. The characters show promising color, but don’t develop beyond two-dimensional puppets of Tryon’s plot. Read for the story itself, however, THE WINGS OF THE MORNING is a fine book, and Tryon’s fans will look forward to the next in the series.