Walter de la Mare Biography

Biography (British and Irish Poetry, Revised Edition)

The first in-depth, full-length biography of Walter John de la Mare was not published until 1993. He was, by the few published accounts of those who knew him, a quiet and unremarkable man. One can reasonably infer from the absence of autobiographical material from an otherwise prolific writer that he was a private man. He seems to have lived his adventures through his writing, and his primary interests seem to have been of the intellect and the spirit.

He was born in 1873 to James Edward de la Mare and Lucy Sophia Browning de la Mare, a Scot. He attended St. Paul’s Cathedral Choir School. While in school he founded and edited The Choiristers’ Journal, a school magazine. In 1890, Walter de la Mare entered the employ of the Anglo-American Oil Company, where he served as bookkeeper until 1908. During these years, he wrote essays, stories, and poetry, which appeared in various magazines, including Black and White and The Sketch. In 1902, Songs of Childhood, his first book—and one of his most lastingly popular—was published. There he used the pseudonym Walter Ramal. Then, after using it also for his novel Henry Brocken in 1904, he dropped it. He married Constance Elfrida Igpen in 1899, with whom he had two sons and two daughters. She died in 1943.

De la Mare’s employment at the Anglo-American Oil Company ended in 1908, when he was granted a Civil List pension of one hundred pounds a year. Thus encouraged, he embarked on a life of letters during which he produced poetry, short stories, essays, and one play, and edited volumes of poetry and essays. These many works reveal something of de la Mare’s intellect, if not of his character. They reveal a preoccupation with inspiration and dreams, an irritation with Freudians and psychologists in general (they were too simplistic in their analyses, he believed), a love of romance, and a love for the child in people. The works reveal a complex mind that, curiously, preferred appreciation to analysis and observation to explanation.

Walter de la Mare Biography (Literary Essentials: Short Fiction Masterpieces)

Walter de la Mare was born on April 25, 1873, in Charlton, Kent, the son of well-to-do parents, James Edward de la Mare and Lucy Sophia Browning de la Mare. In her book Walter de la Mare (1966), Doris Ross McCrosson said that de la Mare’s life “was singularly and refreshingly uneventful.” De la Mare was educated at St. Paul’s Cathedral Choir School in London, where he was the founder and editor of the school magazine, The Choristers’ Journal. In 1890, at the age of seventeen, de la Mare began working as a bookkeeper at the Anglo-American Oil Company in London, a position he held for almost twenty years. While working as a bookkeeper, de la Mare began writing stories, essays, and poetry, many of which were published in various magazines. For a while, de la Mare wrote under the pseudonym “Walter Ramal.” Soon after the publication of his first books, he was granted a civil list pension by the British government amounting to one hundred pounds a year. Thereafter, he devoted himself entirely to literature and writing. De la Mare died at home on June 22, 1956, at the age of eighty-three. He is buried at St. Paul’s Cathedral.

Walter de la Mare Biography (Survey of Novels and Novellas)

Judging from the few published accounts of those who knew him, Walter de la Mare was a quiet and unpretentious man. One can reasonably infer from the absence of autobiographical material from an otherwise prolific writer that he was a private man. He seems to have lived his adventures through his writing, and his primary interests seem to have been of the intellect and spirit.

Walter John de la Mare was born in Charlton, Kent, on April 25, 1873, to James Edward de la Mare and Lucy Sophia Browning de la Mare, a Scot. While attending St. Paul’s Cathedral Choir School, Walter de la Mare founded and edited The Choiristers’ Journal, a school magazine. In 1890, he entered the employ of the Anglo-American Oil Company, for which he served as a bookkeeper until 1908. During these years, he wrote essays, stories, and poetry that appeared in various magazines, including Black and White and The Sketch. In 1902, his first book—and one of his most lastingly popular—was published, the collection of poetry Songs of Childhood. He used the pseudonym “Walter Ramal,” which he also used for the publication of the novel Henry Brocken in 1904, then dropped. He married Constance Elfrida Igpen in 1899, with whom he had two sons and two daughters. His wife died in 1943.

De la Mare’s employment at the Anglo-American Oil Company ended in 1908, when he was granted a Civil List pension of a yearly one hundred pounds by the British government. Thus encouraged, he embarked on a life of letters during which he produced novels, poetry, short stories, essays, one play, and edited volumes of poetry and essays. These many works display something of de la Mare’s intellect, if not of his character. They reveal a preoccupation with inspiration and dreams, an irritation with Freudians and psychologists in general (too simplistic in their analyses, he believed), a love of romance, and a love for the child in people. The works indicate a complex mind that preferred appreciation to analysis and observation to explanation.

Walter de la Mare Biography (Great Authors of World Literature, Critical Edition)

ph_0111200591-Delamare.jpgWalter de la Mare Published by Salem Press, Inc.

Of French Huguenot and Scottish ancestry, Walter John de la Mare (deh-luh-MAYR) was born at Charlton, Kent, April 25, 1873, and died at Twickenham, Middlesex, June 22, 1956. He was educated at St. Paul’s Cathedral Choir School, where he founded The Choristers’ Journal. Though he never went to college, Oxford, Cambridge, and St. Andrews all gave him honorary doctorates. Declining knighthood, he accepted both the Companion of Honor (1948) and the Order of Merit (1953).

In his early days de la Mare used the pseudonym Walter Ramal. In the 1890’s he wrote for such periodicals as The Cornhill Magazine, The Sketch, and The Pall Mall Gazette. For many years he reviewed widely, especially for the London Times Literary Supplement. In 1902, Andrew Lang persuaded Longmans to publish his first book, Songs of Childhood. From 1890 to 1908, de la Mare worked as a statistician for the Anglo-American Oil Company; in later years he devoted all his time to literature. He was married to Constance Ingpen and became the father of four children.

Though friendly and accessible, de la Mare was a very independent writer. He followed his own inspiration and stood apart from literary movements. He was one of the great masters of the supernatural story; as a poet of childhood he was without a peer. His genius was as highly individualized as William Blake’s. De la Mare is best known as a poet; even his prose is...

(The entire section is 440 words.)