Tim Gautreaux Analysis

Other Literary Forms

(Literary Essentials: Short Fiction Masterpieces)

Tim Gautreaux’s Louisiana novel, The Next Step in the Dance, was published in 1998.

Tim Gautreaux Achievements

(Literary Essentials: Short Fiction Masterpieces)

Tim Gautreaux’s story “Same Place, Same Things” was chosen for The Best American Short Stories 1992, “Little Frogs in a Ditch” appeared in The Best American Short Stories 1997, “Welding with Children” appeared in that annual collection in 1998, and “The Piano Tuner” in 1999. Gautreaux has been the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and the National Magazine Award for Fiction. In 1996, he was appointed the John and Renee Grisham Visiting Southern Writer-in-Residence at the University of Mississippi.

Tim Gautreaux Bibliography

(Literary Essentials: Short Fiction Masterpieces)

Blouin, Keith. “People Who Live There Know That Hope Springs Eternal Deep in Louisiana Territory.” The Tampa Tribune, October 17, 1999, p. 4. Compares Gautreaux to Flannery O’Connor in his ability to portray faithfully “good country people.” Discusses his familiarity with the people of Louisiana and his celebration of human strengths and weaknesses and “our everlasting capacity for hope.”

Grossinger, Harvey. “A Trip Through Cajun Country.” Review of Welding with Children, by Tim Gautreaux. Houston Chronicle, December 19, 1999, p. 14. Says Gautreaux is at the top of the list of gifted short-story writers writing in America. Discusses what he calls the “brilliant” title story and describes “The Piano Tuner” as a “masterpiece of delicate shading and method.”

Jacobs, Hal. “Poignant Messages Emerge in Welding with Children.” The Atlanta Journal and Constitution, November 28, 1999, p. 13K. Says Gautreaux’s stories have all the same ingredients as Garrison Keillor’s popular stories: humor, warmth, irony, suspense, and uplifting endings.

Larson, Susan. “Swamp Boogie” and “The Writer Next Door.” The Times-Picayune, May 15, 1998, p. D6, E1. In these two articles, Larson talks about the Louisiana elements in Gautreaux’s writing; says he is a...

(The entire section is 454 words.)