Literary Techniques

The novel is divided into two unequal sections. The first and longest part is Aurora's story. It is a comic tour de force. Aurora is...

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Terms of Endearment Literary Precedents

Terms of Endearment is in the tradition of the modern regional novel. It defines the twentieth-century Texas urban setting in a way...

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Terms of Endearment Related Titles

The earlier two novels share theme and characters with Terms of Endearment. Moving On is the story of Patsy Carpenter, Emma's best...

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Terms of Endearment Adaptations

Terms of Endearment was made into an enormously successful motion picture in 1983. It won five academy awards, including Best Picture,...

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Terms of Endearment Bibliography

(Masterpieces of American Fiction)

Busby, Mark and Tom Pilkington. Larry McMurtry and the West: An Ambivalent Relationship. Denton, Tex.: University of North Texas Press, 1995. Offers a comprehensive overview of McMurtry’s fiction, including insights on film versions of his novels. Also includes bibliographical references and an index.

Cawelti, John G. “What Rough Beast—-New Westerns?” ANQ 9 (Summer, 1996): 4-15. Cawelti addresses the revival of the Western in print, film, and on television. He notes that the new genre reflects the loss of the mythic West of the past and shows how the contemporary Western, instead of glorifying the American spirit, now criticizes America’s shortcomings. Although this essay does not directly address Terms of Endearment, it offers an illuminating perspective on McMurtry’s fiction.

Jones, Malcolm. “The Poet Lariat.” Newsweek (January 11, 1999): 62. Briefly discusses the film versions of McMurtry’s novels, including Terms of Endearment. Offers an interesting profile on McMurtry’s life and work.

Jones, Roger Walton. Larry McMurtry and the Victorian Novel. College Station: Texas A & M University Press, 1994. Jones explores McMurtry’s lifelong love of Victorian authors and explores three Victorian themes that are prominent in all of McMurtry’s fiction: the individual’s importance in society, the conflict between society and nature, and the search for a coherent spirituality in an age that does not believe in God.