Literary Techniques

By beginning Ten North Frederick with the funeral of its major character, O'Hara essentially starts at the conclusion of the story and...

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Ten North Frederick Social Concerns

Ten North Frederick, O'Hara's fifth novel, is the first after Appointment in Samarra to be set in Gibbsville, and it enlarges...

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Ten North Frederick Literary Precedents

The elusive nature of the American Dream of wealth and social prominence — and its detrimental effect on those who pursue it — has been a...

(The entire section is 180 words.)

Ten North Frederick Related Titles

Anyone who reads more than one of O'Hara's novels set in the Gibbsville area comes to understand the geography, the social strata, and the...

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Ten North Frederick Adaptations

A film version of Ten North Frederick was made by Twentieth-Century Fox in 1958. Directed by Philip Dunne and starring Gary Cooper and...

(The entire section is 30 words.)

Ten North Frederick Bibliography

(Masterpieces of American Fiction)

Bruccoli, Matthew. John O’Hara: A Descriptive Bibliography. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1978. A thorough, scholarly bibliography on all aspects of O’Hara’s work. A must for the serious student.

Bruccoli, Matthew. The O’Hara Concern: A Biography of John O’Hara. New York: Random House, 1975. The expertise of Bruccoli is evident here in this comprehensive biography of O’Hara. Contains valuable background, critical references to his works, and a useful bibliography.

Eppard, Philip B., ed. Critical Essays on John O’Hara. New York: G. K. Hall, 1994. Divided into sections on reviews and essays. All of O’Hara’s major fiction is discussed, as well as his relationship to naturalism, his view of society, his short stories, and his view of politics, the family, and small towns. Includes a comprehensive introductory chapter on O’Hara’s career and the reception of his novels, but no bibliography.

Grebstein, Sheldon Norman. John O’Hara. New York: Twayne, 1966. This critical study both interprets and assesses O’Hara’s work. Grebstein is mostly sympathetic toward O’Hara, but has some reservations about his writings. Also assesses other criticism on O’Hara.

MacShane, Frank. The Life of John O’Hara. New York: E. P. Dutton, 1980. Looks at O’Hara’s life through his work. A thorough study well worth reading for its valuable insights.

Shannon, William V. The American Irish. New York: Macmillan, 1963. Deals with O’Hara’s work from the point of view of his Irish ancestry and his desire to escape from it.