Study Guide

Tambourines to Glory

by Langston Hughes

Tambourines to Glory Analysis

Historical Context

The Great Migration
Between about 1890 and 1930, some two-anda- half million African Americans moved from the American South to...

(The entire section is 999 words.)

Tambourines to Glory Literary Style

Scenic Method
Tambourines to Glory is a short novel—barely one hundred pages in the Collected Works of Langston...

(The entire section is 998 words.)

Tambourines to Glory Compare and Contrast

1950s: African Americans are still moving from the rural South to big cities in the North, hoping for good jobs and equal opportunity....

(The entire section is 305 words.)

Tambourines to Glory Topics for Further Study

Research the career of the gospel singer Mahalia Jackson. In what ways is she a role model for Essie? What does Laura admire about her?

...

(The entire section is 255 words.)

Tambourines to Glory Media Adaptations

The novel Tambourines to Glory was adapted by Hughes from his own musical play of the same title, with songs by Jobe Huntley. It was...

(The entire section is 90 words.)

Tambourines to Glory What Do I Read Next?

The first volume of Hughes’s autobiography, The Big Sea (1940), covers approximately the first thirty years of his life, including...

(The entire section is 214 words.)

Tambourines to Glory Bibliography and Further Reading

Sources
Bontemps, Arna, “How the Money Rolled In!” in New York Herald Tribune Books, December 7, 1958, p. 4.

Clarke, Marion Turner, “Selected New Books in Review: Fiction of Harlem, Ireland, Maine,” in Baltimore Evening Sun, November 21, 1958, p. 28.

Gehman, Richard, “Free, Free Enterprise,” in Saturday Review, Vol. 41, No. 47, November 22, 1958, p. 19.

Hughes, Langston, “Goodbye Christ,” in The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes, edited by Arnold Rampersad,

Knopf, pp. 166–67; originally published in Negro Worker, November–December 1932, p. 32.

—, Tambourines to Glory, in The Collected Works of...

(The entire section is 468 words.)

Ed. Scott Locklear