Historical Context

Political and Cultural Orientation of India
Although Akhil Sharma wrote ‘‘If You Sing like That for Me’’ in 1995, he...

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If You Sing like That for Me Literary Style

Point of View
‘‘If You Sing like That for Me’’ is told in the first-person narrative voice from the point of view of the...

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If You Sing like That for Me Topics for Further Study

‘‘If You Sing like That for Me’’ opens with the scene that closes the story: that of Anita awaking to the feeling of being in love...

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If You Sing like That for Me What Do I Read Next?

Winner of the 1980 Booker Prize, Midnight’s Children is by India’s most famous Englishlanguage writer, Salman Rushdie. Written in...

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If You Sing like That for Me Bibliography and Further Reading

Rothstein, Mervyn, ‘‘India’s Post-Rushdie Generation; Young Writers Leave Magic Realism and Look at Reality,’’ in the New York Times, July 3, 2000, p. E1.

Rushdie, Salman, ‘‘The Firebird’s Nest,’’ in the New Yorker, June 23, 1997.

Sachs, Andrea, ‘‘The Subcontinentals: Young, Internationally Savvy Indian Writers Are Making Smart, Splashy Literary Debuts,’’ in Time, Vol. 155, No. 14, April 10, 2000, p. 130.

Sharma, Akhil, ‘‘If You Sing like That for Me,’’ in The Best American Short Stories 1996, edited by John Edgar Wideman and Katrina Kenison, Houghton Mifflin, 1996, pp. 282–306.

Yasui, Brian, ‘‘Bride-Burning Claims Hundreds in India,’’ CNN.com, http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/9608/18/bride.burn/, August 18, 1996, (accessed November 19, 2004).

Further Reading
Forbes, Geraldine, Women in Modern India, Cambridge University Press, 1996. A history of women, politically and socially, from the nineteenth century through the end of the twentieth century in India, Forbes’s well-researched work includes first-person accounts of women’s true experiences of living in India.

Hagedorn, Jessica, ed., Charlie Chan Is Dead: An Anthology of Contemporary Asian American Fiction, Penguin Books, 1993. Hagedorn’s anthology was a breakthrough publication when it came out; it is perhaps the best known anthology of writing from across the Asian American spectrum, including writers with origins in East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. It was published at a time when the study of Asian American literature was just coming into focus in universities, and writers like Amy Tan were just beginning to receive attention from the general American readership.

Mehrotra, Arvind Krishna, History of Indian Literature in English, Columbia University Press, 2003. Two hundred years of Indian literature written in English—up to the publication of The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy—are covered in this collection of historical essays, including well-known poets and novelists as well as scientists and sociologists whose writings have made a significant mark on the development of English-language literature in India.

Rustomji-Kerns, Roshni, ed., Living in America, Westview Press, 1995. Living in America is one of the first anthologies published in the United States featuring fiction and poetry from largely unknown Indian writers in America, reflecting on the Indian American experience.