Sarah Lindsay Analysis

Other literary forms

(Poets and Poetry in America)

Sarah Lindsay is primarily known for her poetry. However, in 1997, she wrote an article for Sky magazine giving advice to young poets.

Sarah Lindsay Achievements

(Poets and Poetry in America)

Sarah Lindsay was a finalist for the National Book Award for her poetry collection Mount Clutter. She was a Randall Jarrell scholar and served as editor of Greensboro Review. Primate Behavior, her first full-length collection of poetry, was named one of Publishers Weekly’s Best Books of the Year and was a Notable Book selection of the American Library Association. In 2009, she received a Lannan Literary Fellowship and the J. Howard and Barbara M. J. Wood Prize from Poetry magazine. Her poems have frequently appeared in Poetry magazine, as well as in The New Republic and the Yale Review. Lindsay’s poem “Tell the Bees” is included in The Best American Poetry, 2009.

Sarah Lindsay Bibliography

(Poets and Poetry in America)

Maynard, Kent. “An ’Imagination of Order’: The Suspicion of Structure in Anthropology and Poetry.” Antioch Review 60, no. 2 (Spring, 2002): 220-244. Discusses connections between poetry and anthropology, while touching on and connecting many key concepts of both disciplines. While Maynard does not specifically mention Lindsay, his topic gives context and further insight into Lindsay’s overall poetical themes.

Peters, Carol. “A Poem Worth Keeping.” Gettysburg Review 22, no. 2 (Summer, 2009): 303-322. Discusses Lindsay as a maker of myths. Focuses on specific poems from each of her three main collections.

Rehak, Melanie. Review of Mount Clutter. The New York Times Book Review, February 9, 2003, p. 24. This reviewer notes Lindsay’s ability to find the human element below the surface of everything, and describes her poems as opening doors to other worlds.

Rigsbee, David. Review of Twigs and Knucklebones. Cortland Review 42 (February, 2009). Offers in-depth analysis of Lindsay’s Twigs and Knucklebones. While technically a review, Rigsbee’s analysis of Lindsay’s poetry is thorough and well presented.