Literary Techniques

Vital to all of Welty's work is the knitting together of the actual and the imaginative. As she says in One Writer's Beginnings...

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The Robber Bridegroom Social Concerns

Although Welty saw a good deal of poverty in her work for the WPA during the depression, and although she grew up in a class conscious South,...

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The Robber Bridegroom Literary Precedents

The most obvious have already been suggested — fairy tales, folk tales, legends, frontier humor and tall tales, classical mythology, and...

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The Robber Bridegroom Adaptations

The Robber Bridegroom was adapted as a Broadway musical in 1974. Although the characters essentially retained their identifying...

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The Robber Bridegroom Bibliography

(Masterpieces of American Fiction)

Champion, Laurie, ed. The Critical Response to Eudora Welty’s Fiction. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1994. In her introduction, Champion presents an overview of the criticism on Welty’s fiction. Four separate essays by different scholars are devoted to various aspects of The Robber Bridegroom. Includes a helpful bibliography of works for further reading.

Gretlund, Jan N. Eudora Welty’s Aesthetics of Place. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1994. A comprehensive overview of Welty’s work focusing on the vivid sense of setting and place that Welty brings to her novels. Includes two interviews with Welty.

Horn, Miriam. “Imagining Others’ Lives.” US News and World Report 114 (February 15, 1993): 78-79. Profiles Welty, who has spent most of her literary career revealing mythic dimensions in the most ordinary of lives. Explores Welty’s genteel southern background and briefly examines some of her works, including The Robber Bridegroom.

Kreyling, Michael. Author and Agent: Eudora Welty and Diarmuid Russell. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1991. Emphasizing their correspondence, this book explores the relationship between Welty and her agent Russell. Kreyling examines Welty’s development as a writer, as well as the encouragement and devotion of Russell to her work. Many of her novels are discussed.

Waldron, Ann. Eudora: A Writer’s Life. New York: Doubleday, 1998. An unauthorized biography, as well as the first to be written, about Welty that presents new material about her personal life and career. Although Waldron does not present in-depth analysis of Welty’s works, this book sheds light on her background and writings.