Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief Characters

Characters

Percy

Percy Jackson is twelve years old and has been diagnosed with ADHD and dyslexia. He struggles in school and has been expelled more than once. It is not surprising that when he goes missing, his stepfather describes him as a delinquent. However, Percy actually has a good heart: he is loyal to his friends, and he hates bullies. In fact, many of his mistakes are not his fault. His ADHD and dyslexia are learning disabilities suffered by most demigods, who have brains that are hardwired to read Ancient Greek (not English) and senses that are too heightened for classroom dynamics. The son of Poseidon, god of the sea, Percy is a naturally gifted swordsman and has the ability to manipulate water. He can also be healed by it.

Over the course of his journey, Percy comes to rely on more than his godly attributes. Percy defeats his first monster primarily through luck. However, by the end of the novel, he comes to rely on his mind as much as his bravery. In particular, Percy’s defeat of Procrustes relies on tricking Procrustes to trap himself in his own bed. As Percy begins to figure out the mysteries that surround the theft of Zeus’s lightning bolt, he becomes less a pawn and more an independent hero, saving the world in spite of his learning disabilities.

Annabeth

Annabeth is the daughter of Athena, goddess of wisdom and strategy. She has been training at Half-Blood Hill for five years when she first meets Percy. Annabeth knows a great deal about the gods, and she often explains to Percy things he does not understand. Although she is knowledgeable, Annabeth prefers to emulate the traits of her mother. To this end, Annabeth always tries to have a plan for victory. Sometimes Annabeth’s emulation of Athena goes too far. In particular, because Athena and Poseidon are rivals, she believes that she and Percy must also be rivals. However, over time, Annabeth learns to value her friendship with Percy and decides that if there will be...

(The entire section is 806 words.)

Ed. Scott Locklear