Patient Power

Entrepreneurs are usually pictured as men and women of boundless energy, able to keep a demanding schedule which might grind down those less motivated to succeed in a tough business world. Readers of James Marshall Galbraith’s two previous books, THE MONEY TREE (1982) and FEAR OF FAILURE (1993), would certainly have imagined him to fit this stereotype. Reading PATIENT POWER will shatter that myth, however, and concurrently raise Galbraith in the eyes of those who appreciate an equally admirable American trait: the ability to forge on with one’s life in the face of a debilitating illness.

Long a victim of Crohn’s disease, a chronic condition that affects the intestinal tract, Galbraith has for more than two decades found himself required to curtail severely both his business and personal activities. For someone accustomed to wheeling and dealing in a high-stress environment where fortunes are won and lost in a matter of days or hours, the change would normally be devastating psychologically as well as physically. Such has not been the case for Galbraith; he not only has come to some accommodation with his disease, but also has taken the time to write frankly about its effects on his life.

As PATIENT POWER reveals, Galbraith has managed with the aid of his family to pursue his interests and continue to be professionally productive while achieving a personal sense of peace and self worth. The same fiery spirit which inspires his earlier books on entrepreneurship is clearly at work in this one as well. Using his exceptional skills as a writer, Galbraith shares his newfound wisdom about the human condition, and about a person’s ability to place “mind” over “matter” in choosing to live a fulfilling life. Anyone who suffers from any long-term illness, and anyone who loves someone who suffers from chronic disease, will find in Galbraith’s book a guide for dealing with the everyday world and a source of personal comfort.