Norma Fox Mazer Biography

Biography (Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults)

Norma Fox Mazer was born May 15, 1931, in New York City and grew up in Glens Falls. She had two sisters— one older and one younger. As a child, she wanted to be a nurse, but she changed her mind in junior high school when she began working on the school newspaper and the town newspaper. From then on, her school life centered around the newspaper and writing. Eventually, she attended Antioch College and Syracuse University.

When she was fifteen, she met the tall, curly-haired Harry Mazer who was six years older than she was. Two years after meeting Harry the first time, they met again and were married February 12, 1950. Harry worked as a longshoreman, a railroad worker, a welder, and an iron worker, but he finally told her that he wanted to be a writer, too. They made it a practice to read and write a little every day. Since they had four children—Anne, Joseph, Susan, and Gina, they began getting up at 3:30 a.m. and writing until 6:00 a.m. They discuss their writing in progress and sometimes do books together.

She enjoys reading and racquetball. In the summer she likes to go to their land in Canada to get away from all the distractions and conveniences of city life. The Mazers live in Pompey Hills outside Syracuse, New York.

A Figure of Speech was nominated for a National Book Award in 1976. Saturday the Twelfth of October won the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1976. Dear Bill, Remember Me?? won the...

(The entire section is 324 words.)

Norma Fox Mazer Biography (Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults)

Norma Fox Mazer was born on May 15, 1931, in New York City, to Michael and Jean Garlen Fox. Educated in New York, she graduated from the Glen Falls High School, where she was editor of her school paper and a correspondent for the town newspaper. She married Harry Mazer, also a writer, on February 12, 1950, after her first year at Antioch College. She later studied at Syracuse University. Her writing career, largely inspired by her four children, developed through years of writing short stories and articles for magazines and plays for television. These works appeared in such varied magazines as Jack and Jill, Child Life, Top of the News, and Redbook, but her major writings have been critically acclaimed novels for young adults, many of which have earned prestigious awards.

After the Rain won an honorable mention for the 1988 Newbery Medal. A Figure of Speech was nominated for the 1973 National Book Award, and Saturday, the Twelfth of October won the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1975. In 1976 Dear Bill, Remember Me? received the Christopher Award, the New York Times outstanding book of the year award, and the American Library Association designation as one of the year's best books for young adults. The American Library Association extended the same recognition to Solid Gold Kid in 1977, Up in Seth's Room in 1979, and Downtown in 1984. Solid Gold Kid also received the...

(The entire section is 294 words.)