Ideas for Group Discussions

The sharply etched characters in this novel, and its strikingly violent climax, will surely create intense responses on the part of readers....

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Ninety-Two in the Shade Social Concerns

Ninety-Two in the Shade presents its readers with an enervated, plasticized America — "Hotcakesland" is McGuane's term — that is...

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Ninety-Two in the Shade Related Titles

McGuane's fictions exist on a continuum in relation to one another: as several commentators have pointed out, they frequently share common...

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Ninety-Two in the Shade Adaptations

The film version of Ninety-Two in the Shade, released by United Artists in 1975, was scripted and directed by McGuane himself....

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Ninety-Two in the Shade Bibliography

(Masterpieces of American Fiction)

Ingram, David. “Thomas McGuane: Nature, Environmentalism, and the American West.” Journal of American Studies 29 (December, 1995): 423-439. Ingram argues that the desire for a pristine nature, which is so ingrained in American culture and is viewed as somewhat unattainable, is central to McGuane’s work. His works explore the role played by old mythologies of the frontier in the ecology and politics of the modern American West. Yet while acknowledging their power, McGuane also realizes the seductiveness of urban life.

McClintock, James I. “ Unextended Selves’ and Unformed Visions’: Roman Catholicism in Thomas McGuane’s Novels.” Renascence: Essays on Values in Literature 49 (Winter, 1997): 139-152. McClintock shows how many of McGuane’s literary themes have been influenced by Roman Catholicism. He contends that McGuane’s protagonists are frequently caught in a crisis of faith, realizing that something is wrong in their lives but unable to resolve their problems without spiritual help.

Morris, Gregory L. “How Ambivalence Won the West: Thomas McGuane and the Fiction of the New West.” Critique 32 (Spring, 1991): 180-189. Focuses on McGuane’s influence in redefining the shape of the “new West” in his works of fiction. Morris discusses McGuane’s insistence on the idea of “American space,” his view of the political ambivalence of the American West, and geography working itself into fiction.

Westrum, Dexter. Thomas McGuane. Boston: Twayne, 1991. Westrum provides a brief biographical survey of McGuane’s life and then presents several critical essays on his work. A valuable resource for the study of this author. Includes bibliographical references and comprehensive index.