Little House in the Big Woods Analysis

Setting

As the title suggests, setting is extremely important in this novel; the cabin, the woods, the wild animals, and the isolation are all...

(The entire section is 610 words.)

Little House in the Big Woods Literary Qualities

Little House in the Big Woods begins like a fairy tale. Within a few lines, the narrator reveals a strong sense of her audience as...

(The entire section is 350 words.)

Little House in the Big Woods Social Sensitivity

For generations, librarians, parents, and teachers have recommended the Little House books as wholesome fare for young readers. Many readers...

(The entire section is 359 words.)

Little House in the Big Woods Topics for Discussion

1. How do you think Ma and Pa want Laura and Mary to act as little girls? How do you think they want them to be as adults? What do Ma and Pa...

(The entire section is 259 words.)

Little House in the Big Woods Ideas for Reports and Papers

1. Talk to an older person in your family or neighborhood about what he or she did as a child. Talk about fun and games or about working and...

(The entire section is 385 words.)

Little House in the Big Woods Related Titles / Adaptations

Little House in the Big Woods is the first the eight books in the Little House series. In Little House on the Prairie, the...

(The entire section is 361 words.)

Little House in the Big Woods For Further Reference

Anderson, William T. "'It Is Better Farther On': Laura Ingalls Wilder Fol- lowed Her Western Vision to the Little Houses on the Prairie."...

(The entire section is 280 words.)

Little House in the Big Woods Bibliography (Masterpieces of American Literature)

Anderson, William. “The Literary Apprenticeship of Laura Ingalls Wilder.” South Dakota History 13 (Winter, 1983): 285-331.

Erisman, Fred. Laura Ingalls Wilder. Boise, Idaho: Boise State University Press, 1994.

Mac Bride, Roger Lea. New Dawn on Rocky Ridge. Illustrated by David Gilleece. New York: HarperCollins, 1997.

Spaeth, Janet. Laura Ingalls Wilder. Boston: Twayne, 1987.

Walner, Alexandra. Laura Ingalls Wilder. New York: Holiday House, 1997.

(The entire section is 57 words.)