Let Us Now Praise Famous Men Analysis

Suggested Readings (Critical Survey of Contemporary Fiction)

Chesnick, Eugene. “The Plot Against Fiction: Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.” Southern Literary Journal 4 (1971): 48-67. Examines the relationship between art and life in Agee’s work and Agee’s uncertainty about the falsifying effects which his writing inevitably forced on his subjects.

Holder, Alan. “Encounter in Alabama: Agee and the Tenant Farmer.” Virginia Quarterly Review 42 (1966): 189-206. Examines the antibook that Agee produced out of his desire to accurately portray his subjects. Agee’s sensitivity to the plight of the tenant farmer sometimes led him to sneer at his readers—and at himself as well.

Kramer, Victor A. Agee and Actuality: Artistic Vision in His Work. Troy, N.Y.: Whitston, 1991.

Lofaro, Michael, ed. James Agee: Reconsiderations. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1992.

Moreau, Genevieve. The Restless Journey of James Agee. New York: William Morrow, 1977.

Rathbone, Belinda. Walker Evans: A Biography. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1995.

Seib, Kenneth. James Agee: Promise and Fulfillment. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1968. The third chapter, “The Failure of Reality,” notes the linguistic power and epic scale of Agee’s essays. Views the work in the tradition of literary social protest and analyzes its structure.

Stott, William. Documentary Expression and Thirties America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986.

Tindall, George Brown. “The Lost World of Agee’s Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.” In James Agee: Reconsiderations, edited by Michael A. Lofaro. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1992. Examines the literary and sociological interest of the 1930’s in the Southern rural poor, a trend which fostered Agee’s work.

Wagner-Martin, Linda. “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men—and Women: Agee’s Absorption in the Sexual.” In James Agee: Reconsiderations, edited by Michael A. Lofaro. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1992. Views the emphasis Agee placed on the Gudger women and his awareness of their sexuality as well as his own role as voyeur.

Let Us Now Praise Famous Men Bibliography (Masterpieces of American Literature)

Suggested Readings

Chesnick, Eugene. “The Plot Against Fiction: Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.” Southern Literary Journal 4 (1971): 48-67. Examines the relationship between art and life in Agee’s work and Agee’s uncertainty about the falsifying effects which his writing inevitably forced on his subjects.

Holder, Alan. “Encounter in Alabama: Agee and the Tenant Farmer.” Virginia Quarterly Review 42 (1966): 189-206. Examines the antibook that Agee produced out of his desire to accurately portray his subjects. Agee’s sensitivity to the plight of the tenant farmer sometimes led him to sneer at his readers—and at himself as well.

Kramer, Victor A. Agee and Actuality: Artistic Vision in His Work. Troy, N.Y.: Whitston, 1991.

Lofaro, Michael, ed. James Agee: Reconsiderations. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1992.

Moreau, Genevieve. The Restless Journey of James Agee. New York: William Morrow, 1977.

Rathbone, Belinda. Walker Evans: A Biography. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1995.

Seib, Kenneth. James Agee: Promise and Fulfillment. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1968. The third chapter, “The Failure of Reality,” notes the linguistic power and epic scale of Agee’s essays. Views the work in the tradition of literary social protest and analyzes its structure.

Stott, William. Documentary Expression and Thirties America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986.

Tindall, George Brown. “The Lost World of Agee’s Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.” In James Agee: Reconsiderations, edited by Michael A. Lofaro. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1992. Examines the literary and sociological interest of the 1930’s in the Southern rural poor, a trend which fostered Agee’s work.

Wagner-Martin, Linda. “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men—and Women: Agee’s Absorption in the Sexual.” In James Agee: Reconsiderations, edited by Michael A. Lofaro. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1992. Views the emphasis Agee placed on the Gudger women and his awareness of their sexuality as well as his own role as voyeur.